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the fears of progressives as obama conducts a foreign policy that looks like bush's. i am not pro-drone. i am pro-destroying al qaeda. i am pro-protecting america. i am pro-a better drone program and i am pro ending this war as soon as we can but i fear that's a long way away. as douglas macarthur said, only the dead have seen the end of war, and we may now be in a permanent war. okay. that does it for "the cycle." martin, it's yours. >> passionate patriotism from toure. thank you. it's monday, february 11th, and a pope has abdicated, the president prepares to face the nation, but republicans are still stuck on benghazi. >> the president's state of the union address. could be the president's last best chance to address a captive audience. >> do republicans have the leverage now? >> none of the things i ran on as part of the tea party have been fixed. >> i don't want to live with this sequester. >> how do we get growth with jobs? >> no confirmation without information. >> are you going to support him for defense secretary? >> i will see the rest of the answers to his questions but certainly
information about what the white house did during the benghazi attack. he told "foreign policy magazine," quote, we need to know what the president's conversations were. i would vote no on thursday to disclosure unless the information is provide. by tuesday, or almost every day of the week, he said the president has responded to his satisfaction. but he didn't vote for closure. here's his latest. watch. >> there are still questions outstanding. i believe that senators have the right to have those questions answered. the senators and i had questions today. but there are other questions. >> like can you give us a copy of every speech you every gave krks you give us a dollar-for-dollar assessment for every dollar you made? by ta way, if you don't, we're going to accuse you. and joy, by the way, you're younger than i am by many, many years. we went back and looked at the innuendo. i don't know what he's running for. people say attorney general. i don't know why he's -- >> yeah, he's not running for president because i think he was born in canada. you said earlier in your introduce, chris, t
back to the election" rather than the point of view he has about foreign policy. >> we don't agree on very much in terms of foreign policy. when i think about the national security team that led to my comment that i thought the president was making second-rate choices, that goes to things like hagel for defense, susan rice to state, brennan for c.i.a.. >> brennan worked closely, was in the c.i.a. >> john was around when we were there. he didn't play a prominent role. that's really developed since he joined this administration. >> rose: but there are -- >> but there are people that could be appoint as director of c.i.a. folks like steve cap pass. i don't know if you know him? >> rose: i know him very well. >> talented guy, enormously respected. >> rose: retired from the c.i.a.. >> he has retired. they brought him back once before, we did. with people of that caliber available, i'm surprised you end up going with somebody like brennan. i just -- i come back to the proposition that it looks to me-- and speculative on my part, obviously, i'm not in the meetings-- that the president has
, immigration, the environment, everything basically, but his lead on foreign policy is a staggering 14 points. what makes republicans think this is a good thing to have a fight over? >> right. up until recently everybody said, look, politics stops at the water's edge, and that hasn't been the case for the last couple years with this republican party. but it turns out that it wasn't necessarily that both parties followed that axiom because they were being nice about it. it turns out that it's incredibly bad politics to challenge your sitting president overseas. and, you know, this benghazi thing has not worked out for the republican party at all. they tried effectively to make it the biggest issue of the presidential campaign in the last several weeks, and people just didn't buy into it. what they saw is a tragedy. something that was -- if it could have been prevented, it should have been prevented, but they weren't going to start pointing blame and ask for the resignations of hillary clinton and throw barack obama out of office. >> right. >> and the idea that you'd be able to stop future cia
to foreign policy, an official announcement of afghanistan troop withdrawals, 34,000 troops out by february 2014, effectively ending the afghanistan war. but in the end, while the economy took up most of the debate and speech time, it is wounded in the hall who will be remembered. >> it's the end that we're going to remember because of the people in the room and the way he created that arc about give it a vote, i think that's what we'll remember most out of the speech. >> reporter: unless you live on twitter, where fist bumps, vice presidential glasses and water bottles are viral. for "nightline," i'm jim avila on capitol hill. >> thanks to jim avila for reporting on the state of the union address and the twitterverse as well. >>> just ahead, president obama said tonight that victims of gun violence deserve a vote. we meet the woman who emerged a hero in the fort hood massacre and says the president made her a promise he hasn't kept. and says the president made her a promise he hasn't kept. ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your c
a speech done now for days to react to the events of overnight? >> usually they have a foreign policy section and i think they'll add it. and, you know, usually they find a way to work in foreign policy and go in that section and it's -- you know, these speeches are, you know, the structure of them is done a long time in advance but they'll still being worked on until the last minute. >> absolutely. and also, we know through the latest developments today, the president will announce 34,000 troops leaving afghanistan, as well. another part of the puzzle if you will of us learning when's in that speech. what i'm curious about your opinion on, our first read team says there are three economic questions that the president will perhaps answer tonight. one of them is how can the united states create more jobs at home. when the speech outline is happening, are you guys talking about these are the questions people are asking at home. mr. president, this is how to answer. is it that kind of set-up? >> well, you know, usually you start out i think by, you know, the president and his speechwrite
house did during the benghazi attack. he told "foreign policy" magazine, quote, we need to know what the president's conversations were. i would vote no on cloture on thursday unless the information is provided. by tuesday -- actually by yesterday, which almost every day of the week he's changed his mind, the white house had responded to his satisfaction, but he still didn't vote for cloture. he still wouldn't vote to bring this matter of hagel's confirmation up to a vote, and here is his latest. let's watch. >> there are still questions outstanding. i believe that senators have the right to have those questions answered. the senator from south carolina and the senator from new hampshire and i had a response from the president today on the question that we had, but there are other questions. >> like can you give us a copy of every speech you ever gave? can you give us a dollar-for-dollar assessment of every dollar you ever made? by the way, if you don't tell us, we're going to accuse you of getting money from the north koreans. that's the way we will pay you. joy, you're younger than
, this is 2016, lining it up, foreign policy experience, sitting down with bb, the whole thing. >> well, it's true. and there are a number of boxes that one has to check if they're going to head in that direction. and i might note, on the democratic side of the aisle, here's the former secretary of state now going off on a limited speaking tour. so it seems perhaps that they're at logger heads, and time will tell. >> it's an interesting time, though. but a lot of press from marco rubio this weekend. that's for sure. thanks for joining me. >>> president obama is expected to go all-in to help elect house democrats come 2014. politico describing the president's early commitments as, quote, unprecedented and transformational. coming up, more on the democrats' possible plan to retake the house and what republicans may be doing to make sure they stay in control. >>> plus -- >> i could not believe that he would say something like that. and to a baby. or about a baby. and then to hit him was just -- i -- i felt like i was in another world. i was shaking. >> have you heard about this story? that's t
support from senior statesman, defense and foreign policy organizations and the jittery 31 hearing he was endorsed enthusiastically by to former chairman of the committee the senators on the mission has been endorsed by five former secretary of defense who served under democratic and republican presidents, gates , a calling, perry, a brown and ugly year and endorsed by three former secretaries of state of six former national security advisers. receive letters of undress and from nine former ambassadors who worked on middle east issues and 11 and retired officers and 50 embassadors in national security officials. supported by the major groups of american veterans including iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, of vfw, a vietnam vets of america, and that an american legion and receive support from the military officers association of america, and the noncommissioned officers it is underscored by "war and peace" and i believe he enlisted in at army and received two purple hearts for the combat infantry badge. he served as deputy administrator during the reagan ministration and was tw
foreign policy magazine, quote, we need to know what the president's conversations were. i would vote no on cloture on thursday unless the information is provided. by tuesday, actually by yesterday, almost every day of the week he's changed his mind, the white house responded to his satisfaction but still didn't vote for cloture. still wouldn't bring this matter up to a vote. here's his latest. let's watch. >> there are still questions outstanding. i believe that senators have the right to have those questions answered. senator from south carolina and senator from new hampshire had a response from the president today on the question that we had. but there are other questions. >> like can you give us a copy of every speech you ever gave? give us a dollar for dollar assessment of every dollar you ever made. if you don't tell us we're going to accuse you of getting money from the north koreans. joy, you're younger than me, i think, by a lot of years and i have it to tell you, this does -- we're going to get to this. i'm going to sell this second segment coming up. we went back and looked
. john, what do you think? >> he will talk about foreign policy. forbes policy will not be the thrust of the speech. jobs, the economy will be. but when he talks about foreign policy, it's a pretty safe bet north korea will be on his mind. the president set to give that address at 9:00 eastern time. reports indicate that he may do a little bit more finger pointing this time than reaching across the aisle. congressman adam kinzinger, a republican from ill. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> we're getting previews about how the president may sound tonig, glen thrush of politico says don't expect anything like the call for peaceful collaboration that addressed the joint congress in 2009. >> month of the same. i think this is an opportunity. the president has an amazing opportunity to call republicans and democrats together to say both sides have to accept things they don't want in order to accept the problems in the country and for future generations. that's what's missing, the discussion of what happens next with the next generation of americans and, unfortunately,
that they have questions about some foreign policy decisions he has made in the past. i think particularly senator cruz and others went too far in applying as a consquence that somehow he is dangerous to the united states. he won the election to decide who wants to be secretary of defense. >> what do you think was behind a lot of that? >> i think it had a lot to do with a sort of neoconservative movement who are very angry to senator hagel about the surge and critical comments he made and has to do with a number of conservative jewish americans who are concerned about his jews on israel. i think they came together and made a hot political issue with it. i am pleased that they will not hold the nomination up because we don't have a secretary of defense right now. it is a very bad impression to filibuster a nominee for secretary of defense because you disagree with his foreign policy conclusions. >> the administration's policy on drone attacks on suspected terrorists has been under a great deal of scrutiny. now there is new attention on the use of drones domestically. this is the hill report
talk about foreign policy, it's a direct impact on the department of defense and these are exact questions we should be asking. >> heather: and this is not unprecedented. there are two other times that a cabinet secretary needed 60 votes and both of those bush nominees facing harry reid and democrats and environmental agency head. both had to meet 60 vote threshold. now it has happened to hagel. the third time in ten years. so it's not unprecedented. my question to you, why rush it? >> because the department of defense is responsible for our military. we are currently in conflict right now. i think this is something that has to deal with national security. you really need to get serious and get to work here. we can't be talking about things that are not relevant. they are asking for information about benghazi and chuck hagel had nothing to do with benghazi. if you wanted questions about that you need to talk on other people. >> heather: they got one of those questions answered, that is whether or not president obama himself personally called libyan officials on the night of septe
, had choice words for the president's foreign policy team. i'm not sure i agree with that. in "the new york times," a great must-read, quietly killing a consumer watchdog. it's how the republicans are just doing everything they can not to have the consumer financial protection bureau that was created by elizabeth warren under president obama actually function because it would keep them, quite frankly, from being able to get their money from all their donors on wall street. and they do not want to lose the people who helped them out. so they want to make sure that the consumer suffers so that they can gain politically. it's a good one. take a look at it. coming up -- >> we're also going to talk about nancy pelosi saying we don't have a spending problem, and the problem with medicare is not medicare. we've got a lot to talk about straight ahead. >> gail collins of "the new york times" joins us straight ahead. >> she's got a great column. >> i love it. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely,
've covered foreign policy in washington for a long time. can you put this into some kind of perspective, historically? how rare is it for this to happen to a president's nominee? >> well, this is very rare. i mean, it's unprecedented. i covered the john tower nomination. he was the former chairman of the committee of the armed services committee. and that was also something that john mccain brought up yesterday. that's part of the grudge match. he wasn't filibustered because the administration just lost that one. but this filibuster with a recess permits the opposition to keep upping the ante. i mean, one of the things that you and joe are pointing out here is that every time chuck hagel turns a corner, they're flowing something else up there. benghazi wasn't even on his watch. they used it to try to get leverage. to try to get more information about what the president did on that night. did he go to bed? was he calling the pentagon? who was in charge? something that they could have asked in another context. they did get a letter from the white house lawyer yesterday which responded at
? >> what will he not talk about? >> well, they think that there will not be much talk about foreign policy. you threw me a curve there, maureen. that was good. i think the fact is that they feel that they have a good policy, he's not going to talk about the stories that you just ran about chuck hagel and about brennan at cia, and he is not going to talk about benghazi. he is going to say that the fate of the owe that the state of the union is strong, and he is going to point to his accomplishments. he feels very confident. based on the election results, he is going to do everything he can to make himself and the democratic party look good. >> perhaps, speaking to the state of the republican party, florida senator marco rubio, whose national profile is certainly being elevated, he is giving the republican response, not just in english but in spanish. what ask that say to you? >> that's the wave of the future. obviously they read the election figures. 71% of the voters who were hispanic voted democratic. they realize they're in electoral doomsday if they can't get into that con stitt you the
being unsafe, not the number of guns were americans who own them but the dollar, a debt and weak foreign policy
and patriotism and service. my focus is entirely on his long-standing foreign policy record, and his opposition to sanctions to any form of direct action dealing with those who would cause harm. and so in no way, shape, or form have i impugned his pages is the i focus on his foreign policy record which even the "washington post" describes as the french. cycling the senator from florida suggested that i stated that mr. hagel has not been truthful. to the contrary, my point is exactly the opposite. that the question this committee asked whether he has director received money from foreign sources enables him to answer that truthfully, no, while at the same time not disclosing whether the hundreds of thousands of dollars he has received has come indirectly from foreign sources. his answers could be entirely truthful and yet the example i use of course, that money, that 200,000 could have come from a foreign nation, and he could answer that truthfully, no, i haven't received it but it came from an intermediary. and my point is not that he has lied. it is rather that he has refused to answer reasonab
, she was talking about war, i don't think we will hear a lot about foreign policy tonight. we will hear about the president trying to and pull troops out of afghanistan. and we will probably hear about north korea, since that happened today. that might change things a little. by peter will be a good number of things that he will not mention, which is interesting. guest: i have never observed a pattern of wars beginning in conjunction with state of the union addresses. one thing i will watch for this evening is the congressional black caucus, a collection of black members of congress, met recently with valerie jarrett on the hill. she's one of the president's top advisers, to discuss the state of the union to some extent. the question i have is whether he is going to address black unemployment specifically and things that will help bring that number down. i think that is what the congressional black caucus wants, but i don't know if that is when he's going to do. host: host: kumar worked in florida and washington. jonathan strong has some experience at "roll call." here reported on envir
of foreign policy, and if you look at the fact that he has ended in the war in iraq, he has meandering towards ending the war in afghanistan, he's allowing the pentagon, and you've got to remember when you look at the pentagon, you're looking at an institution that has the fine motor skills of a dinosaur. it takes the pentagon a long time to put together a timetable such as for withdraw. all obama has to do, and i know it's not this simple, but i would look at the experience, came in in 1995, gave the speech in 1996, announcing the bleeding wound, he had nazis tell schulz we were getting out and the military had a year to turn it around, and they wouldn't be able to. 88, they announced the timetable, 89 they were gone. we need to do something similar. military's had its chances. we had 11 commanders in afghanistan in 11 years. look at thomas rick's book "the generals" that devotes a lot of attention to this. that's not a war where we can be successful. it's not the kind of military we have. there's no military that's ever been successful in a counter insurgency, and not only do they ha
's a surprise to the foreign policy and military people that north korea is a threat and has these nuclear ambitions. i think that president obama actually for many years even going back to the senate and before, was very focused on this issue of nuclear proliferation. and it's the kind of thing that you can talk about in a speech like this, because it isn't only about legislation and what can get passed in the here and now. it's also domestically and in foreign terms kind of what do you want the country to know and what do you want it to do. >> let me ask the difference between doing an inaugural address and the state of the union, you have worked on both of these addresses before. have you ever done both and had to differentiate? i want to know about the mechanics of what it is like for someone like you, to have to craft two extraordinarily important speeches that are heard on a world stage and do they have alternating missions? >> they do a bit have alternating missions, obviously an inaugural address is more formal. it's outdoors. it speaks in some ways to grander themes and longer tim
from members of congress, foreign policy experts, and a panel of voters, journalists and scholars who talked to christina bellantoni in a google hangout last night. and still to come on the "newshour": the dramatic end to the massive manhunt in california; preschool programs to close the achievement gap in chicago and a call for action on immigration. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the president's nominee to be secretary of the treasury jack lew fended off criticism today of his time at citigroup. he was ceo from january of 2008 until early 2009, when he joined the obama administration. during his tenure, he invested in a citi fund that was registered in the cayman islands, well known as an offshore tax haven. republicans pressed lew on the issue at his senate confirmation hearing today. >> my benefit was really very small in the sense that i took a loss when i sold the investment. i always reported all income. i always paid any taxes that were due. i very strongly believe that we should have tax policies that make it difficult, if not i
. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot >> warner: on sunday, republican senator lindsey graham said he would put a hold on hagel and on john brennas nonati as c.i.a. director, until he gets more answers from the white house about the september attack in benghazi, libya. in a statement today, white house spokesman josh earnest reaffirmed president obama's support for hagel. and said: late today, reid forced a vote on breaking the fillibuster. the current defense secretary leon panetta who'd been due to leave his post today has said he will stay on until his successor is confirmed. and, at a ceremony honoring for and late today the president said it was unfortunate to have politics intrude while he's still presiding over a war in afghanistan. to help us understand the implications, the politics and what's next, we turn to pentagon reporter mark thompson of "time" magazine. and todd z
. >> i don't know. >> when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the-- >> can you answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong that's a pretty straight forward question, i'd like the answer whether you're right or wrong and they are you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. >> what do you think that the iranian foreign ministry so strongly supports your nomination to be secretary of defense? defense? >> i have a difficult enough time with american politics and senator, i have no idea. >> do you think it's appropriate for the chief civilian leader of the u.s. military forces to agree with the statement that both the perception, quote, and the reality is that the united states is, quote, the world's bully? >> i didn't hear her say that, by the way, united states and i think my comment was it's irrelevant in good observation. i don't think i said that i agree. >> sean: jay sekulow, your reaction? >>
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)